Posts

Gum Disease and Its Causes

Image
Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease. Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is an infection of the tissues that surround your teeth, and is caused by a buildup of plaque. In its early stages, symptoms may include:

gums that bleed easilyred, swollen, tender gumsbad breath
Some factors that can put you at higher risk of developing gingivitis include:

poor dental caresmoking or chewing tobacco genetics crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean pregnancy diabetes medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives
This might sound scary, but at this stage the disease is still reversible. Eliminating the infection can be as easy as trip to the dentist office for a professional cleaning, as well as daily brushing and flossing.

Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. This is why it’s important to schedule regular dental checkups in addition to maintaining…

Yellow Teeth: Causes and How to Whiten Yellow Teeth

Image
What Causes Yellow Teeth?Do you have yellow teeth? Are you looking for a smile makeover? It’s best to start by evaluating your whitening needs and goals by looking at the color of your teeth and your habits or other factors that may have caused discoloration: Diet: Certain foods that are high in tannins, such as red wine, are potential causes of yellow teeth. Some of the most common causes of tooth discoloration include drinking beverages such as coffee, soda, and wine. These substances get into the enamel of your teeth and can cause long-term discoloration.Smoking: Smoking is one of the top causes of yellow teeth, and stains from smoking can be stubborn. But smokers can improve their yellow teeth by quitting smoking, following a complete oral care routine of twice-daily toothbrushing and daily flossing, and using the right teeth-whitening products.Illness: Certain medical conditions or medications are also causes of yellow teeth. Patients who are undergoing chemotherapy for head or n…

6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 3 of 3)

Serve Carbs with Care
Whether it’s the crunch or the fact that they’re shaped like their favorite animals, kids love crackers and chips. The truth? “Many crackers are cookies with salt,” Dr. Hayes says. Not only do the carbohydrates in things like crackers and chips break down into sugar, they also tend to get stuck in the tops of your teeth for long periods of time.  

Set an Example
You’d do anything for your kids. Now, are you ready to do all of the above for yourself too? Dr. Shenkin says setting an example can make a big difference in your whole family’s health. Eat well, brush twice a day for two minutes and clean between your teeth once a day. “If you want to change your child’s habits, it isn’t just about what they do,” he says. “Do the same thing with them.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 2 of 3)

Skip the Soda
Call it soda, call it pop. But sugary, carbonated beverages by any name are bad news for your child’s teeth. “One can of soda is the amount of sugar recommended for three days for a child,” Dr. Hayes says.

In fact, a February 2016 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association found a strong association between sugary drinks and poor dental health in teenagers. Researchers asked teens 14-19 in Mexico about how many sugary beverages they drank, then examined their teeth. They found 31.7% had tooth erosion, which means their enamel had been eaten away. The main culprit? Soda. 

Be Picky About Sticky Snacks
If you’ve been under the impression that gummy or sticky fruit snacks are healthy alternatives, you’re not alone. Many parents are surprised to learn they are really closer to candy than fruit, especially when it comes to sugar. “Fruit rollups and other dried fruit snacks are like nature’s candy,” Dr. Shenkin says. “It is like candy, but in some respect it’s worse th…

6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 1 of 3)

Image
When working with her young patients, pediatric dentist and ADA spokesperson Dr. Mary Hayes teaches them this simple, but important, saying: “Sugar is fun to eat, but not good for your teeth!”

That’s because your child might love sweet treats, but the bacteria in his or her mouth loves them even more. “Sucrose (sugar) is the ‘food’ for the bacteria that cause tooth decay,” Dr. Hayes says. “Those bacteria produce acid that etches away the teeth.”

Limiting the amount of sugar your entire family eats is good for your teeth and key to your overall health. Here are some dentist-recommended ways to start saying good-bye to unnecessary sugar throughout the day.

Know the Limits
When choosing a snack, keep an eye on added sugar (sweeteners like corn syrup or white sugar that are added to prepared foods). Naturally occurring sugars are less worrisome, as they are found in healthy choices like milk and fruit.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that people age 3 and older should consume …

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 3 of 3)

Image
Improper Brushing Technique 








Here's one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

Using a Brush That's Not the Best Fit for You 








There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you're comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing. No matter which you choose remember that it's not all about the brush- a clean mouth is really up to the brusher!

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sh…

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 2 of 3)

Image
Brushing Right After Eating 








If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing-especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

Storing Your Brush Improperly 








When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles 








Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com