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Busting 7 Myths about Oral Health

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It's essential to know the truth about oral health because bad oral hygiene can lead to tooth decay, tooth loss, and other complications. Oral health can also impact your overall health! There tend to be many misconceptions about oral health, but it's essential you know the facts. Learn the truth behind common dental myths so you know how to take care of your teeth. Myth #1: 'Sugar-free sodas are better for my teeth' Just because soda is sugar-free, it doesn't mean it's harmless to your teeth. Sugar surely contributes to tooth decay and cavities, but sugar isn't the only thing. Even sugar-free sodas contain acids and carbohydrates combined with bacteria and saliva to result in plaque, also known as biofilm, buildup. If your teeth are not cleaned regularly, that plaque buildup can lead to tooth decay and gingivitis. Myth #2: 'Dental health doesn't affect my overall health.' Oral health is a good indicator of overall health, and poor oral hygiene c

Sensitive Teeth: What they Mean, Causes, and Home Remedies

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What Does Tooth Sensitivity Mean? Is eating ice cream or sipping hot coffee painful? Do brushing and flossing cause a zing? If you feel pain or tingling, then you may have sensitive teeth. At least 45 million Americans suffer from sensitive teeth; one-in-five adults suffers from sensitive teeth. Tooth sensitivity is highest between the ages of 25 and 30 years. A layer of hard enamel protects the crowns of your teeth. A layer of cementum protects the tooth root under the gum line. Gum tissue is a protective blanket that covers the tooth roots. Underneath the hard enamel, or cementum, is the porous dentin which is made up of tiny openings called tubules or channels. Inside each tubule lies a nerve that comes from the tooth's pulp (the mass of blood vessels and nerves in the center of the tooth). When the dentin loses its protective covering and is exposed, it may cause hypersensitivity and discomfort when you drink cold liquids , eat hot foods , eat sweet or sour foods , or when you

Breastfeeding: 6 Things Nursing Moms Should Know About Dental Health

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Breastfeeding is one of the first (and most personal) decisions a mother makes for her baby. It can help your baby’s body fight infections and reduce health risks like asthma, ear infections, SIDS and obesity in children. Nursing moms may lower their chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer. But did you know breastfeeding can impact the dental health of both baby and mom? Here’s how: Breastfeeding May Help Build a Better Bite Several recent studies, one in Pediatrics in 2015 and one in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, found that babies who were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months were less likely to have teeth alignment issues such as open bites, crossbites, and overbites, than those exclusively breast fed for shorter lengths of time or not at all. Still, this doesn’t mean your exclusively breastfed baby won’t need braces someday. Other factors, including genetics, pacifier use, and thumbsucking, affect alignment. “Every baby, eve

Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Prosthetic Joints and Orthopedic Implants

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If you have had a joint replacement and taken antibiotics before dental work in the past, you may not need to make a trip to the pharmacy before your next procedure. The American Dental Association has found it is no longer necessary for most dental patients with orthopedic implants to have antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infection. What Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis? Antibiotic prophylaxis (or premedication) is simply the taking of antibiotics before some dental procedures such as teeth cleaning, tooth extractions, root canals, and deep cleaning between the tooth root and gums to prevent infection. We all have bacteria in our mouths, and a number of dental treatments—and even daily routines like chewing, brushing or flossing—can allow bacteria to enter the bloodstream (bacteremia). For most of us, this isn’t a problem. A healthy immune system prevents these bacteria from causing any harm. There is concern, however, that bacteria in the bloodstream could cause infection elsewhere in the

Ketosis Breath: When Your Diet Affects Your Oral Health

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The ketogenic diet has created buzz in the health community and for good reason. Many have found success in restricting their carb intake so that the body burns fat instead of glucose to lose weight. If you're following a keto diet, you might notice some unpleasant side effects that accompany the positive changes on the scale. For example, so-called ketosis breath is a common complaint. Understanding keto breath is the first step to ensuring your diet doesn't impair your oral health. Ketosis and Your Breath If a lower-carb lifestyle is supposedly healthy, then why does it result in foul-smelling breath? The answer is in how your body breaks down fats. After swapping a typical carb-heavy diet for one that promotes fats and protein, your body goes into ketosis. As the University of California, San Francisco explains, ketosis is a process wherein your body begins to burn fat for energy, since glucose stores (your body's preferred source of energy) aren't readily available

Teeth Stains: Causes, Types, and How to Remove Teeth Stains

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Teeth stain for many reasons, including your food and drink choices, oral hygiene, and medication use. Teeth stains occur on the surface of the tooth or below the tooth enamel and some people develop both types of teeth stains.    Types of Tooth Discoloration (Stains) Tooth discoloration can occur as a result of surface stains, due to actual changes in your tooth material, or because of a combination of both factors. Dental professionals have identified three main categories of tooth discoloration:  Extrinsic sTeeth Stains : An extrinsic tooth stain is staining on the surface of the tooth. It occurs when stain particles, such as pigmented residue from food or drink, build-up in the film of protein that covers the tooth enamel. Extrinsic tooth stains are typically caused by tobacco use or by regularly drinking coffee and tea , wine or cola drinks. This type of tooth stain responds well to regular dental cleaning and brushing the teeth with whitening toothpaste. Intrinsic Teeth Stains :

Types of Mouth Viruses and Bacteria

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Mouth bacteria and viruses can lead to a number of oral health issues if not treated properly. Tooth decay, gum disease, and mouth sores are only a few of the conditions that may occur when an infection takes root. Learn more about the different viral and bacterial infections that may affect your tongue and mouth and what you can do to prevent them. Common Bacterial and Viral Mouth Infections  Bacterial and viral infections on the tongue and mouth are relatively common, and in most cases can be taken care of with proper diagnosis and treatment. Several infections that may affect the mouth and tongue include: Tonsil Stones – Also known as Tonsilloliths, are bacterial infections that affect your tonsils.  White Tongue – A condition where the lingual papillae on the tongue swell up and trap bacteria and food debris.  Oral Thrush – A fungal infection affecting the tongue and throat.  Coxsackie Virus – Most common in children, this mouth virus can cause painful blisters.  Strawberry Tongue