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Gum Pain Causes, Relief and Treatments

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What Causes Painful Gums?
If you experience painful gums when you eat, drink, brush, or floss, you may be wondering what’s causing it and how you can treat it. Painful or bleeding gums can be caused by improper brushing or flossing techniques, gum disease, chemotherapy, tobacco use, or certain hormonal changes. It is very common for gum disease to lead to pain and bleeding, so resolving the problem is an important part of keeping your gums healthy. Your gums provide the overall support for your teeth and the basis of a healthy mouth, and if not properly cared for, early gum disease can progress to other serious oral health problems.
Below are several different causes of gum pain. Being familiar with these causes of gum pain can help you talk to your dental or medical professional when they’re diagnosing the cause of your discomfort.
Canker Sores: These are painful ulcers found in your mouth that can cause serious gum pain. Canker sores can be caused by stress or injury to the tissue in y…

Dental Grills — The New Trend Affecting Dentistry And The Health Of Your Teeth

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It’s the latest trend in dental wear, but there’s nothing cool about the damage it could do to your smile. Dental Grills are a cosmetic, metal and sometimes jeweled tooth covering developed in the early 1980s by hip hop artists. Grills, also called fronts, are removable and fit over the front teeth. Dental grills are made of gold, silver or jewel encrusted metals that run as little as $20 and well into the thousands for more elaborate designs. Can Wearing a Dental Grill create Oral Health Problems?  Yes, they can. It’s important to conduct thorough oral hygiene procedures including flossing and brushing with an anti-microbial toothpaste as food and plaque can easily develop on the grill and can cause irritation to the gingival margin and gingivitis may develop and the possibility of tooth decay. Dental grills can also cause abrasion to adjoining teeth, gum recession, tooth discoloration or chipped teeth. A grill should always be removed before eating or rinsing to clean the mouth, and m…

Aging and Dental Health

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As you age, it becomes even more important to take good care of your teeth and dental health. One common misconception is that losing your teeth is inevitable. This is not true. If cared for properly, your teeth can last a lifetime. Your mouth changes as you age. The nerves in your teeth can become smaller, making your teeth less sensitive to cavities or other problems. If you don’t get regular dental exams, this in turn can lead to these problems not being diagnosed until it is too late.  If you want to feel good, stay healthy, and look great throughout life, you might be surprised what a difference a healthy mouth makes. Tips for Maintaining and Improving Your Oral HealthBrush twice a day with a toothbrush with soft bristles. You may also benefit from using an electric toothbrush. Clean between your teeth once a day with floss or another flossing tool. If you wear full or partial dentures, remember to clean them on a daily basis. Take your dentures out of your mouth for at least four hou…

Teaching Teens Proper Oral Hygiene

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When your teen is already busy with friends, schoolwork and catching up on sleep, proper oral hygiene can go on the back burner. When running late for school, sometimes there just isn't time for a full two minutes of toothbrushing. But as a parent, it's up to you to make sure that your teen practices good dental care. By making oral hygiene part of a simple daily routine, you can help your teen sneak in regular brushing and flossing along with all the other plans in his or her schedule.
Use Teen-Based Products One of the reasons teens might be slacking in the dental care department is the fact that most oral hygiene products aren't exactly tailored to adolescent tastes. Strong flavors and boring designs could make teens less than enthused when it comes to daily care. That's where youth-geared products can really come in handy. By appealing to teens' tastes and style, it's easier to coax them into a daily care routine. Check out the Colgate®Fresh Confidence produc…

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay: Causes & Prevention

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Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.  What Causes Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected. There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby.  Tooth decay is a disease that can begin with cavity-causing bacteria being passed …

Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 2 of 2)

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When Do Baby Teeth Fall OutOnce all the baby teeth have fully come in, it is very important to keep up with twice daily brushing to keep them clean and strong. It is recommended that parents brush their kids' teeth until the age of eight. During that time, those new baby teeth will begin to wiggle and fall out. Baby teeth usually begin falling out in order of appearance. The lower center teeth go first, followed by the top center pair, and so on. This usually starts happening by age six, but some kids can start losing teeth as early as age four. Most children get excited when they feel their teeth start to wiggle (and the Tooth Fairy’s inevitable visit is also a big help), while some kids worry that losing a tooth will hurt when it falls out. If your child is worried, you can reassure him or her that they probably won't feel anything. A baby tooth typically won’t loosen until the permanent tooth below begins pushing it up to take its place. But it is possible for kids to lose a…

Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 1 of 2)

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Your child’s first set of teeth is as much of a milestone coming in as they are when they are wiggling loose. With the anticipation and anxiety associated with both events, it is understandable that parents want to know when to expect their baby’s first teeth to come in and when those baby teeth will fall out. When Do Baby Teeth Come In
So, how many baby teeth are there? There are 20 primary baby teeth that are already present in a child’s jaw at birth, and they usually start appearing – or erupting– between six months and one year. You can expect your child’s full set of teeth to come in by age three. You can also refer to a baby teeth chart for this. Just remember that every child is different, so no exact dates should be expected, but below is an approximate order of when you can expect baby teeth to come in: Lower center teeth (or lower center incisors) arrive between approximately six to ten months.Top center teeth (or top center incisors) arrive around eight to 12 months.Lateral in…