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6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 3 of 3)

Serve Carbs with Care
Whether it’s the crunch or the fact that they’re shaped like their favorite animals, kids love crackers and chips. The truth? “Many crackers are cookies with salt,” Dr. Hayes says. Not only do the carbohydrates in things like crackers and chips break down into sugar, they also tend to get stuck in the tops of your teeth for long periods of time.  

Set an Example
You’d do anything for your kids. Now, are you ready to do all of the above for yourself too? Dr. Shenkin says setting an example can make a big difference in your whole family’s health. Eat well, brush twice a day for two minutes and clean between your teeth once a day. “If you want to change your child’s habits, it isn’t just about what they do,” he says. “Do the same thing with them.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 2 of 3)

Skip the Soda
Call it soda, call it pop. But sugary, carbonated beverages by any name are bad news for your child’s teeth. “One can of soda is the amount of sugar recommended for three days for a child,” Dr. Hayes says.

In fact, a February 2016 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association found a strong association between sugary drinks and poor dental health in teenagers. Researchers asked teens 14-19 in Mexico about how many sugary beverages they drank, then examined their teeth. They found 31.7% had tooth erosion, which means their enamel had been eaten away. The main culprit? Soda. 

Be Picky About Sticky Snacks
If you’ve been under the impression that gummy or sticky fruit snacks are healthy alternatives, you’re not alone. Many parents are surprised to learn they are really closer to candy than fruit, especially when it comes to sugar. “Fruit rollups and other dried fruit snacks are like nature’s candy,” Dr. Shenkin says. “It is like candy, but in some respect it’s worse th…

6 Ways to Reduce Your Child's Sugary Snacking (Part 1 of 3)

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When working with her young patients, pediatric dentist and ADA spokesperson Dr. Mary Hayes teaches them this simple, but important, saying: “Sugar is fun to eat, but not good for your teeth!”

That’s because your child might love sweet treats, but the bacteria in his or her mouth loves them even more. “Sucrose (sugar) is the ‘food’ for the bacteria that cause tooth decay,” Dr. Hayes says. “Those bacteria produce acid that etches away the teeth.”

Limiting the amount of sugar your entire family eats is good for your teeth and key to your overall health. Here are some dentist-recommended ways to start saying good-bye to unnecessary sugar throughout the day.

Know the Limits
When choosing a snack, keep an eye on added sugar (sweeteners like corn syrup or white sugar that are added to prepared foods). Naturally occurring sugars are less worrisome, as they are found in healthy choices like milk and fruit.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that people age 3 and older should consume …

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 3 of 3)

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Improper Brushing Technique 








Here's one technique to try for a thorough brush: First, place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums. Then, gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes. Next, brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Finally, To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

Using a Brush That's Not the Best Fit for You 








There are many toothbrushes that can leave your teeth fresh and clean, including manual and power brushes that carry the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Both get the job done. Try different types until you find one you're comfortable with. For example, a power brush can be easier to hold and does some of the work for you if you have trouble brushing. No matter which you choose remember that it's not all about the brush- a clean mouth is really up to the brusher!

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sh…

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 2 of 3)

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Brushing Right After Eating 








If you feel the need to clean your teeth after eating or drinking, wait at least 60 minutes before brushing-especially if you have had something acidic like lemons, grapefruit or soda. Drink water or chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance to help clean your mouth while you are waiting to brush.

Storing Your Brush Improperly 








When you’re done brushing, keep your toothbrush upright and let it air dry in the open. Avoid keeping your toothbrush in a closed container, where germs have more opportunity to grow.

Using a Brush with Hard Bristles 








Soft bristles are a safe bet. And be mindful to be gentle, especially where your gums and teeth meet, as you brush. Talk to your dentist about what kind of toothbrush is best for you.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 1 of 3)

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Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long 








The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean-these are signs it’s time to let go. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Not Brushing Long Enough 








Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short -the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer. Or distract yourself by humming your favorite tune!

Brushing Too Hard 








Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that loves to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.

Dry Mouth at Night: The Causes and Management Tips

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Below is an article written by by Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS and found on Colgate.com 

Have you ever woken up from a sound sleep with a dry mouth at night? Dry mouth, or xerostomia, can be caused by something as simple as sleeping with your mouth open or as complex as a side effect of medication. Read on to find out what may be at the root of your nighttime lip smacking.

Signs of Dry Mouth
Dry mouth can be as simple as the salivary glands not producing enough saliva to keep the mouth moist. Saliva is key to washing debris from your teeth and remineralizing tooth enamel. With too little of it, you may be at risk for tooth decay.

Aside from increasing your risk for cavities, dry mouth can be uncomfortable. If you are experiencing dry mouth at night, some noticeable morning signs are:

A sticky feeling in your mouthThick or stringy salivaBad breathDry or sore throatCracked or chapped lipsMouth soresChanged sense of taste
What Causes Xerostomia?
The occasional case of dry mouth at night may…