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Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 1 of 2)

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Your child’s first set of teeth is as much of a milestone coming in as they are when they are wiggling loose. With the anticipation and anxiety associated with both events, it is understandable that parents want to know when to expect their baby’s first teeth to come in and when those baby teeth will fall out. When Do Baby Teeth Come In
So, how many baby teeth are there? There are 20 primary baby teeth that are already present in a child’s jaw at birth, and they usually start appearing – or erupting– between six months and one year. You can expect your child’s full set of teeth to come in by age three. You can also refer to a baby teeth chart for this. Just remember that every child is different, so no exact dates should be expected, but below is an approximate order of when you can expect baby teeth to come in: Lower center teeth (or lower center incisors) arrive between approximately six to ten months.Top center teeth (or top center incisors) arrive around eight to 12 months.Lateral in…

Early Childhood Cavities:Causes, Effects and Prevention

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Sometimes called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, Early Childhood Cavities is a serious disease that can destroy your child's teeth – but it can be prevented. What Causes Early Childhood Cavities? Letting your baby fall asleep with a bottle. When your baby is asleep, the liquids that contain sugar stay around the teeth and can cause decay. Even breast milk and formula contain sugar.Prolonged nursing with mother or allowing your baby to fall asleep while nursing.Allowing your infant to walk around with a bottle.Put your child to bed without a bottle ... Your child can fall asleep without a bottle! Here are five tips to try: Let your child take a "security" blanket, teddy bear, doll, or favorite toy to bed.Quietly sing or play restful music.Hold or rock your child.Give your child a back rub to help him or her to relax.Read or tell your child a story.What are the Effects of Early Childhood Cavities? Tooth lossEar and speech problemsCrooked permanent teethSevere painPoor self-imageTooth …

Adult and Braces: Why Are More Adults Getting Braces? and How Do I Know If Adult Braces Are Right For Me?

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Why are more adults getting braces?
As braces have become less bulky and visible in recent years, more and more adults are wearing them, for a variety of reasons. Some adults want to correct problems with their teeth or jaws before they cause serious or further damage. Others want to feel better about their appearance by addressing longstanding cosmetic concerns. Keep in mind that even "cosmetic" problems can cause real damage over time. Teeth and jaws that are not aligned properly can lead to premature wear and tear, advanced tooth decay and gum disease, dentures or other reconstructive solutions and even more extensive surgery to correct serious problems.
New techniques and the advent of clear, less noticeable braces means that adults are increasingly turning to braces to correct:

Gaps between teeth (spacing)Teeth that push against one another (crowding)Crooked teethOverbitesUnderbitesCrossbites
How do I know if adult braces are right for me?
If you think you might benefit from…

Braces

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Braces and orthodontic treatment are used to correct “bad bites,” or malocclusion (teeth that are crowded or crooked). In some cases your teeth may be straight, but your upper and lower jaws may not meet properly. These jaw or tooth alignment problems may be inherited or could result from injury, early or late tooth loss, or thumbsucking. If you have an abnormal bite your dentist may recommend braces or another orthodontic treatment to straighten out your smile. Correcting the problem can create a nice-looking smile, but more importantly, orthodontic treatment results in a healthier mouth. Not correcting an abnormal bite could result in further oral health problems, including: tooth decay gum disease tooth loss affected speech and/or chewing abnormal wear to tooth enamel jaw problems
Straightening your teeth can be accomplished in different ways. The kind of orthodontic treatment you have will depend on your preference and the options provided by your dentist or orthodontist. Tradition…

Braces: How Braces Work, Pain Relief, & Keeping Braces Clean

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Braces can correct misaligned teeth to improve your smile and your dental health, but braces pain can make you uncomfortable. How Braces WorkKnowing a bit about how braces work can help you prepare for the braces pain you might experience. Braces place continuous pressure on the teeth to slowly move them into a different position. The key components of braces are:Brackets: A bracket is attached to each tooth or to a band placed around the tooth. Brackets hold the wires that actually cause the teeth to move. Braces pain associated with brackets may include pain from the band or the brackets.Wires: The wires used for braces are known as arch wires. They are attached to the brackets, and an orthodontist adjusts them at regular visits. Sometimes braces pain occurs soon after the braces are adjusted.Benefits Of BracesBraces pain can be uncomfortable, but wearing braces to improve your bite can help to eliminate other types of mouth and tooth pain caused by misaligned teeth. Other benefits o…

How To Limit The Effects Of Sugar On Teeth

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Cookies, cakes, candies and sodas – everywhere you go, there are sugary treats to tempt you and your kids. The effects of sugar on teeth may not be noticeable right away, but too much can lead to tooth decay if you don't stay on top of it. Here's how sugar can harm your family's dental health and what you can do to prevent it.
Acid Attacks
When you eat or drink sugary foods – refined, processed or in the form of carbohydrates – you're feeding the beast. Bacteria in your mouth digest the foods you eat and specifically feed on the sugar, producing acids that can slowly dissolve tooth enamel and cause tooth decay. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), these acids do the most damage to your teeth for 20 minutes after eating; this is what is known as an "acid attack." So the more sugary foods you eat throughout the day, the more your teeth are exposed to decay-causing acids.
Sensible Food Choices
What can you do to protect yo…

Plaque

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Your teeth are covered with a sticky film called plaque that can contribute to tooth decay and gum disease. Plaque contains bacteria, which following a meal or snack containing sugar can release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down, eventually resulting in cavities. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. This makes it more difficult to keep your teeth clean. When tartar collects above the gum line, the gum tissue can become swollen and may bleed easily. This is called gingivitis, the early stage of gum disease. You can prevent plaque buildup and keep your teeth cavity-free by regularly visiting the dentist, brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and cleaning between your teeth with dental floss daily.
To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org
Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA …