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Showing posts from June, 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 1 of 3)

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Serve the Right Kind of Crunch
Potato chips are standard party fare, but they bring unwanted guests into your mouth. Chewed-up chips often settle in the pits of your teeth, giving cavity-causing bacteria the chance to make a meal from your teeth.

Instead, put apples and pears on your fruit platter, and stock your veggie tray with carrots, celery and raw broccoli. They're like natural toothbrushes, scrubbing off build-up and stimulating saliva to wash away what’s left.

Cheese, Please
A slice of cheddar can make a grilled burger so much better. Plus, who doesn’t love a cheese platter? Dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese are low in sugar and rich in calcium and phosphorous, which strengthen and protect enamel. Research also suggests that eating more dairy may lower your chances for developing gum disease. So go ahead and say cheese!

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(3…

Special Care Dentistry

Learn more about dental care for people with special needs.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

Tartar

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Tartar is a deposit that forms when plaque hardens on the tooth. Individuals vary greatly in their susceptibility to tartar buildup. For many, these deposits build up faster with age. Tartar is easily noticeable because of its yellow or brown color on teeth.
What Causes Tartar Buildup When plaque accumulates and is not removed from teeth, it can harden and turn into tartar. Because tartar buildup bonds strongly to enamel, it can only be removed by a dental professional.
Help Prevent Tartar Buildup While tartar can only be removed by a dental professional, you can avoid tartar buildup by removing plaque. To help prevent tartar, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice daily, preferably with a tartar-control fluoride toothpaste like many from Crest, and floss once a day with a product like GlideƆ. And visit your dental office regularly for oral exams and cleanings.
Above article from: Crest.com
Sheron Dental Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD
1200 NE 99th St. Vancouver, WA …

Bad Breath (also known as Halitosis)

Learn more about Bad Breath, which is also known as Halitosis.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

What are the Stages of Gum Disease?

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What is Gum Disease?

Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colorless film that constantly forms on your teeth. If not removed through daily brushing and flossing, plaque can build up and the bacteria infect not only your gums and teeth, but eventually the gum tissue and bone that support the teeth. This can cause them to become loose, fall out or have to be removed by a dentist.
There are three stages of gum disease:

Gingivitis: this is the earliest stage of gum disease, an inflammation of the gums caused by plaque buildup at the gumline. If daily brushing and flossing do not remove the plaque, it produces toxins (poisons) that can irritate the gum tissue, causing gingivitis. You may notice some bleeding during brushing and flossing. At this early stage in gum disease, damage can be reversed, since the bone and connective tissue that hold the teeth in place …

Causes and Treatment of Canker Sores

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Cold Sores and Canker Sores Compared
It’s easy to confuse cold sores and canker sores.

Unlike a cold sore, a canker sore is not contagious, and it appears on the inside tissues of the mouth rather than the outer surface of the lip (which is where cold sores appear). A canker sore, also known as an apthous ulcer, looks like a small, round or oval lesion that has a white or yellowish center surrounded by red. They tend to be indented, like a crater, rather than raised, like a bump.

Canker sores most often appear on the inside of the cheeks and lips or at the base of the gum. Canker sores are not usually associated with bleeding gums, so if you are experiencing bleeding gums you should see your dentist to be evaluated for possible gum disease.

The majority of canker sores are mild. Mild canker sores are less than one-third of an inch long and usually heal on their own after a few weeks.

But major apthous ulcers, defined as larger than 10 mm in size, can take more than a month to heal and can …

Tooth Abscess Symptoms And Treatment

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Symptoms And Treatment Of Tooth Abscess
If you have a toothache that goes beyond mild to moderate tooth pain and reaches a level of severe, throbbing pain, it could be a sign of a tooth abscess. A tooth abscess is a pus-filled lesion at the roots of a tooth, and is caused by an infection. The first sign is a throbbing toothache that won’t go away.

At first, the tooth will likely be sensitive to chewing and biting, as well as to heat and cold. You also may develop a fever, swollen lymph nodes in your jaw or neck, or swelling on your face.

If the abscess ruptures, you’ll know because of the nasty-tasting discharge in your mouth. Although the pain may recede if the abscess ruptures, you still need to be treated by a dentist in order to get rid of the infection, save the tooth and avoid complications. If the abscess doesn’t rupture, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. This is not a problem to ignore.

Treatment will likely include draining the abscess if it hasn’t ruptured. Yo…

How to Fight Mouth Germs and Keep Your Smile Healthy

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Brenna Stone

Does the thought of mouth germs taking up residence on your teeth make you feel a little uncomfortable? It should! Masses of harmful microorganisms in the mouth can form plaque, the sticky substance that adheres to the teeth and gumline. Plaque can really harm your teeth and gums. When it isn't removed by regular brushing and flossing, it can lead to cavities and gum disease! Find out what you can do to reduce the amount of germs in your mouth.

Regular Toothbrushing
Toothbrushing is a powerful tool for fighting germs. At the minimum, brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste; once after breakfast and once before going to bed. There is no harm in brushing your teeth more frequently. You can brush after meals to cut down on plaque formation and to freshen your breath. Spend a full two minutes gently brushing all surfaces of your teeth and your tongue. Use a toothpaste like Colgate Total that is…

Recognizing and Treating Oral Thrush

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Recognizing and Treating Oral Thrush
Oral thrush, also known oral candidiasis, is a condition that occurs when a fungus called Candida albicans builds up on the lining of your mouth.

Anyone can develop oral thrush, but babies, young children, older adults, or anyone with a compromised immune system due to an illness such as HIV are more susceptible. Conversely, candidiasis lesions can be an early sign of an HIV infection.

The main symptom of oral thrush is creamy white lesions in the mouth, usually on the tongue or inner cheeks. In some cases, the lesions may appear on the roof of the mouth or on the back of the throat.

Interestingly, oral thrush is not caused by poor oral hygiene. Thrush is caused when the naturally occurring fungi in the body get out of balance, which is why the very old, very young, and people with weak immune systems are at higher risk. Good oral hygiene, however, is an essential part of treating oral thrush. Healthy adults and children can recover fairly easily from …

Bioactive Glass Leads to Longer-Lasting Fillings

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Dentists complete 122 million composite tooth restorations in the United States each year, according to Oregon State University (OSU). But the average lifetime of posterior dental composites is only 6 years. Bioactive glass may improve their durability and provide some of the minerals that have been lost to tooth decay.

“Bioactive glass, which is a type of crushed glass that is able to interact with the body, has been used in some types of bone healing for decades,” said Jamie Kruzic, a professor at the OSU college of engineering. The hard and stiff material can replace the inert glass fillers now mixed with polymers to make modern composite tooth fillings.

“This type of glass is only beginning to see use in dentistry, and our research shows it may be very promising for tooth fillings,” he said. “The bacteria in the mouth that help cause cavities don’t seem to like this type of glass and are less likely to colonize on fillings that incorporate it. This could have a significant impact on…

Chew on this: Six dental myths debunked

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Myth 1: The consequences of poor oral health are restricted to the mouth

Expectant mothers may not know that what they eat affects the tooth development of the fetus. Poor nutrition during pregnancy may make the unborn child more likely to have tooth decay later in life. “Between the ages of 14 weeks to four months, deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, vitamin A, protein and calories could result in oral defects,” says Carole Palmer, EdD, RD, professor at TUSDM and head of the division of nutrition and oral health promotion in the department of public health and community service. Some data also suggest that lack of adequate vitamin B6 or B12 could be a risk factor for cleft lip and cleft palate formation.

In children, tooth decay is the most prevalent disease, about five times more common than childhood asthma. “If a child’s mouth hurts due to tooth decay, he/she is less likely to be able to concentrate at school and is more likely to be eating foods that are easier to chew but that are…

How to Brush Your Teeth Properly: A Quick Guide

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by AM Hopkins

Everyone knows that brushing their teeth plays a major role in their overall health, but they may not be aware of the correct way to brush their teeth. The American Dental Association recommends that you brush your teeth at least twice each day; here is a quick guide to ensure you know how to do it properly.

Purchase the right toothbrush. Before you even begin the process of brushing your teeth, it's important that you have the right toothbrush. The type of toothbrush you select depends on your specific needs. If you need a toothbrush mostly for removing plaque, a soft-bristled brush is best. On the other hand, if you are concerned about reaching hard-to-reach spaces, you should consider a toothbrush with a smaller head. in the Colgate Oral Care resources.

Take your time. You should spend at least two minutes brushing your teeth. This may seem like a long time - the average person usually falls sh…

Diabetes and Your Mouth # 6: Floss Every Day

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Flossing helps control plaque. It can reach where a toothbrush can't, like between the teeth. Floss daily with floss and interdental cleaners that carry the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Ask your dentist for tips if you're not sure how to floss. Like everything else, flossing gets easier with practice.

The above article is from: WebMD.com

Sheron Dental Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD
1200 NE 99th St. Vancouver, WA 98665 (360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

Three Oral Hygiene Tips for Men

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When it comes to personal oral hygiene, not all men are as attentive to their teeth as women. Starting with the checkup, surveys suggests men are more likely to see a dentist only in the event of a problem. So, guys, learn how to step up your oral care routine with the following tips for maintaining a healthy smile and preventing oral health problems before they start.

Toothbrush Tips
Brushing is just one part of keeping your mouth clean - doing so twice a day, in particular. However, the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). It's not enough to brush quickly and be on your way; two minutes of thorough cleaning is your most effective approach. Keep in mind you don't need to brush hard during this process. Use a soft-bristled brush such as Colgate® Slim Soft™ and brush gently at a 45-degree angle.

Some helpful hints: Replace your toothbrush every three to four months, rinse it after each use and store it in an upright po…

Dental Sealants for Children

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the importance of dental sealants as a preventive dental treatment for your children!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com

Family Guide to Oral Health

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com

By following the information in this guide, you and your family can have healthy teeth and gums to last a lifetime. As a parent, you can work with your children to help them understand why good oral care is important - and show them how to do it right!

Four Steps to a Bright Smile

Brush at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, especially after eating breakfast and before bedtime.Floss every day.Limit the number of times you eat snacks each day.Visit your dentist regularly.
It's easy to guide your family toward good oral health. All it takes is the right information and a little practice to keep them moving in the right direction!

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

Infographics on how to brushInfographcis on how to flossA list of preventive dental care tips!
Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 35…

Diabetes and Your Mouth # 5: Brush Daily, Brush Right

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Brushing your teeth twice a day not only keeps your breath sweet, but also helps rid the mouth of bacteria that makes up plaque and can lead to oral infections. To brush properly, point bristles at a 45-degree angle against the gums. Use gentle back-and-forth strokes all over your teeth -- in front, in back, and on chewing surfaces -- for two minutes. If holding a toothbrush is hard for you, try an electric toothbrush. Also brush your gums and tongue.

The above article is from: WebMD.com

Sheron Dental Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD
1200 NE 99th St. Vancouver, WA 98665 (360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com