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Showing posts from January, 2019

8 Bad Brushing Habits to Break in 2019 (Part 1 of 3)

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Keeping Your Toothbrush for Too Long 








The ADA recommends changing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, so make a resolution to change your toothbrush with every season this year. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your teeth clean-these are signs it’s time to let go. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Not Brushing Long Enough 








Speed demons, listen up! Your teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. Most of us fall short -the average time most people spend brushing is 45 seconds. If you’re racing through cleaning, try setting a timer. Or distract yourself by humming your favorite tune!

Brushing Too Hard 








Be gentle with your teeth. You may think brushing harder will remove more leftover food and the bacteria that loves to eat it, but a gentle brushing is all that’s needed. Too much pressure may damage your gums.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.

Dry Mouth at Night: The Causes and Management Tips

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Below is an article written by by Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS and found on Colgate.com 

Have you ever woken up from a sound sleep with a dry mouth at night? Dry mouth, or xerostomia, can be caused by something as simple as sleeping with your mouth open or as complex as a side effect of medication. Read on to find out what may be at the root of your nighttime lip smacking.

Signs of Dry Mouth
Dry mouth can be as simple as the salivary glands not producing enough saliva to keep the mouth moist. Saliva is key to washing debris from your teeth and remineralizing tooth enamel. With too little of it, you may be at risk for tooth decay.

Aside from increasing your risk for cavities, dry mouth can be uncomfortable. If you are experiencing dry mouth at night, some noticeable morning signs are:

A sticky feeling in your mouthThick or stringy salivaBad breathDry or sore throatCracked or chapped lipsMouth soresChanged sense of taste
What Causes Xerostomia?
The occasional case of dry mouth at night may…

Antimicrobial Therapy for Gum Disease

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Below is an article written by by Tracey Sandilands and found on Colgate.com 

Antimicrobial therapy is a form of oral treatment used to eliminate or reduce the development of bacterial infections in the mouth. The therapy aims to prevent periodontal diseaseresulting from infections, which can cause painful, bleeding gums and loosening of your teeth.

Preparation and Treatment
If your dentist decides you will benefit from antimicrobial treatment, they will likely start with scaling and root planing. This process removes plaque and calculus (tartar) from the sulcus area around the teeth using either a scaler or instruments as well as an ultrasonic scaling device. In severe cases where there are periodontal pockets greater than 5-6 mm deep, the dentist may recommend that the patient be seen by a periodontist to evaluate the area with deeper pocketing and determine if gum surgery may be necessary. The scaling and root planing and gum surgery treatments require local anesthesia to reduce the p…