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Showing posts from May, 2019

How To Limit The Effects Of Sugar On Teeth

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Cookies, cakes, candies and sodas – everywhere you go, there are sugary treats to tempt you and your kids. The effects of sugar on teeth may not be noticeable right away, but too much can lead to tooth decay if you don't stay on top of it. Here's how sugar can harm your family's dental health and what you can do to prevent it.
Acid Attacks
When you eat or drink sugary foods – refined, processed or in the form of carbohydrates – you're feeding the beast. Bacteria in your mouth digest the foods you eat and specifically feed on the sugar, producing acids that can slowly dissolve tooth enamel and cause tooth decay. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), these acids do the most damage to your teeth for 20 minutes after eating; this is what is known as an "acid attack." So the more sugary foods you eat throughout the day, the more your teeth are exposed to decay-causing acids.
Sensible Food Choices
What can you do to protect yo…

Plaque

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Your teeth are covered with a sticky film called plaque that can contribute to tooth decay and gum disease. Plaque contains bacteria, which following a meal or snack containing sugar can release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down, eventually resulting in cavities. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. This makes it more difficult to keep your teeth clean. When tartar collects above the gum line, the gum tissue can become swollen and may bleed easily. This is called gingivitis, the early stage of gum disease. You can prevent plaque buildup and keep your teeth cavity-free by regularly visiting the dentist, brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and cleaning between your teeth with dental floss daily.
To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org
Sheron Dental
Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD

1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA …

Mouth Sores

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Dental health is not limited to your teeth. Sores or irritations can develop in and around the mouth. Fortunately, they usually heal on their own within a week or two. Mouth sores come in several different varieties and can have any number of causes, including: Infections from bacteria, viruses or fungusIrritation from a loose orthodontic wire, a denture that doesn’t fit, or a sharp edge from a broken tooth or filling.The symptom of a disease or disorder.
Your dentist should examine any mouth sore that lasts a week or longer. For more information about specific kinds of mouth sores, please visit our pages on canker sores, cold sores, oral thrush and leukoplakia.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org
Sheron Dental Adam Sheron, DMD
Chad Sheron, DDS
Richard Sheron, DMD
1200 NE 99th St.
Vancouver, WA 98665
(360) 356-7096
SheronDental.com